Archive for the ‘Games-Workshop News’ Category

 

Hello Reader!

 

This is the Portuguese version of our article about Games Workshop’s return to Brazil by a new importer/distributor. You can check the English version here.

 

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Olá Leitor!

 

Se você acompanha nossas redes sociais já viu em primeira mão lá em nossa página no Facebook a nota anunciando que os produtos da Games Workshop vão voltar a ser distribuídos no Brasil por intermédio de um novo importador/distribuidor nacional.

 

 

Já estava na hora de condensar toda essa informação em um artigo aqui no The Painting Frog. Essa é a segunda vez que me sento para compartilhar com vocês a noticia de que a Games Workshop esta chegando no Brasil, em mais um capítulo dessa relação inconstante ao longo dos anos entre a companhia e a comunidade brasileira.

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Olá Leitor.

 

Este artigo é a versão em inglês do nosso artigo sobre o retorno da Games Workshop ao Brasil. Você pode conferir a versão em português aqui.

 

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Hello Reader!

 

If you’re already following the blog’s social media channels, you’ve probably seen our note about Games Workshop getting distributed in Brazil again as it was published back in January on our Facebook page (if you haven’t yet, like our page there to keep up to date with our news).

 

 

So after publishing snippets for a while I felt it was high time I put all this information together on an article here on the “The Painting Frog” blog. This is actually the second time I put pen to paper (actually fingers to the keyboard) to write about Games Workshop’s products being made available in Brazil by means of a local importer and distributor, in yet another chapter in the relationship between GW and the local hobby community devoted to the company’s games.

 

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Hello there.

It’s finally refreshing to have good news to share with you people. Wayland Games has finally issued a comment about the whole Games Workshop embargo situation thing.

Here it is:

Hi Everyone,

 

Before we start, if you’d allow me to present a little background about Wayland before we get into the meat of the issue I’d be grateful.

 

We laid out our little web store back in August 2008, our beginnings were humble, with my brother and I packing orders in a spare room. It wasn’t ideal but it was what we had to start with and we grew and grew through the continued business of our loyal customers through four warehouses to our current location. In thirty three months we have gone from a spare room in Essex, UK with my brother and I packing boxes to a global operation with fourteen full time staff which is now positioned as one of the largest if not the largest independent hobby retailer in the world. We run our business today as we always have done, in a professional and ethical manner both within the letter and the spirit of the law. Almost all suppliers like us, customers enjoy our openness and service-oriented outlook and whilst we’re realistic enough to know we’re not by any means perfect we will always strive to improve to ensure our central tenet of great prices and better service.

 

Managing such growth has been far from simple; we have experienced growing pains like any business in any sector that has exploded in market share terms. Our growing pains have also been more painful as we continually seek to adjust to a shifting commercial landscape from our dominant supplier, Games Workshop. Like many of you, I believe that Games Workshop produce a fantastic product which gives endless joy to countless people. I am proud to be associated with them.  Unsurprisingly, therefore, I read with real concern the statement by the CEO Mark Wells over the new trade terms which effectively prevents us selling Games Workshop supplied products outside Europe. Mark’s statement can be found at: http://www.facebook.com/notes/games-workshop/our-changes-to-european-trading-terms/227996923881812

Mark seems to be clearly of the view that on-line retailers (and we are not purely that, of course given our bricks and mortar presence) “free ride” on the back of Games Workshop’s bricks and mortar outlets. We have sought over the years, and I thought with some success and recognition, to demonstrate to Games Workshop the value that we provide not just in terms of sales but also in terms of pre and after sales service (not to mention our activities at trade fairs), which is clearly equivalent to the service that is provided on the “ground” by bricks and mortar outlets. Quite aside from the legality of Games Workshop’s actions, we are confused by the commercial attitude of Games Workshop which hampers our ability to sell to hobbyists to the clear disadvantage of both Games Workshop (albeit maybe not their retail arm) and the hobbyists themselves.

I will not air anyone’s dirty laundry in public. Therefore, I am writing to Games Workshop separately (its board, lawyers and their principal shareholders) to share my concerns in greater depth. I hope that commercial common sense will prevail and that we can continue to work with Games Workshop to expand their market and bring a great product to as many people as possible at the best price possible. After all, Games Workshop not only has a clear responsibility to the market but also a clear responsibility to its shareholders (which, after all, could be you and me!).

In the meantime, we believe after the announced terms are implemented we shall be able to continue to offer all of our loyal customers the same product range that we offer today. There may be a small lead time to implement but we’ve been given a rather short period to react. We will comply fully and completely with the new terms and conditions of sale imposed upon us and will not contravene them in any capacity whatsoever (albeit we would not wish that to be seen as acceptance of their legality), all we seek to achieve is that customers both old and new are able to benefit from our view of the market wherever they are located. We all love our hobby.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be providing updates as to how the process of implementing these changes is coming along, the chances are we’ll use Facebook to disseminate this information as it is a great platform for customers to interact with us and each other.

 

We look forward to continue to serve you and we always will.

 

Keep on Wargaming.

 

Richard.

Wayland Games


Like I said on previous posts it is really reassuring to hear that a company such as Wayland is willing to fight for it’s costumers. They are indeed a business and are getting paid in the end of the day but Rich and everyone else there have not opted for the easy way out and stood up for us.

The underlined part of their public statement show that, thanks to their efforts, those hobbyists outside the E.U. might still have a hobby after all.

Way to go Rich and thanks for stepping down into the trenches with the affected community, the respect you’re garnering through your actions will surely strengthen your company’s position not only in the market but also in your consumer’s trust.

Over and out!

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Salve pessoal.

A Wayland games soltou hoje sua posição oficial acerca da proibição da GW no que diz respeito às vendas para fora da União Européia.

Vou replicar aqui a parte mais importante do comunicado que diz:

“In the meantime, we believe after the announced terms are implemented we shall be able to continue to offer all of our loyal customers the same product range that we offer today”.

 

Traduzindo:

“Enquanto isso, acreditamos que após os termos anunciados serem colocados em prática seremos capazes de continuar oferecendo a todos nossos clientes leais a mesma gama de produtos que oferecemos hoje”.

 

Aparentemente a Wayland encontrou uma forma de continuar nos vendendo, possivelmente como já especulávamos na forma de “Direct Only”, ou seja, por encomenda pagando o preço cheio GW (sem os costumeiros descontos). Ainda assim a Wayland continuará sendo uma opção viável e acessivel através da internet para que toda a comunidade brasileira continue efetuando suas compras e não seja excluída unilateralmente do hobby cada vez mais popular por aqui.

Prestigiemos a Wayland Games então em nossas compras pessoal. Eles estão fazendo por merecer.

Até a próxima!

Hello there.

It appears that Games Workshop has indeed taken notice of the turmoil raging over the internet about its announced embargo to countries outside the E.U.

Mark Wells, chief executive for Games Workshop, publicly answered an email of a concerned hobbyist explaining why GW would enforce such a policy:

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Dear Anthony,

  

Thanks for contacting Games Workshop about the change in our trading terms for European accounts. I know this has frustrated you and for that I am truly sorry. As a long standing customer, you deserve to know why we made this decision.

  

As you know, we introduce people to the Games Workshop hobby of collecting, painting and gaming with Citadel miniatures through our Hobby Centres and local independent trade accounts. Games Workshop Hobby Centres run introductory games and painting sessions, beginner lessons, hobby activities and events. We provide all these services free of charge. We only recover this investment if customers then buy products from us.

  

Where we don’t have a Games Workshop Hobby Centre, we support local independent trade accounts. These businesses provide a convenient place for customers to buy our products close to where they live. We support these businesses with local customer service teams and warehouses to ensure customers have immediate access to our best selling products and new releases. Many customers discover the hobby this way.

  

In addition we invest millions of pounds every year in our design studio and factory to ensure that each month we release more new products. This makes the Games Workshop Hobby more exciting for existing customers, helping them stay in the hobby longer. We can only afford to do this because of the volume of customers we have recruited and developed through our local Hobby Centres and trade accounts.

 

 It is for this reason that we have changed our European Trade terms. Over recent years, a number of currencies have moved a long way from their historical relative values, and this has opened the door for some traders to try to take advantage of these currency movements and offer deep discounts to overseas hobbyists. This has been the case with European internet traders selling to some of our customers overseas.

  

While this may seem great in the short term, the simple fact is that European internet traders will not invest any money in growing the hobby in your country. Their model is to minimise their costs and free-ride on the investment of Games Workshop and local independent shops in creating a customer base.

  

We on the other hand have to keep paying our Australian staff, rents and utilities in Australian dollars. While some customers have suggested we halve our prices, the only way we could do that is if we halve our Australian staff’s salaries, default on our rents and not pay our suppliers until exchange rates move back into alignment. That’s the reality of what a price reduction of this scale means. And we both know that customers who are motivated by price are not going to change their behaviour if it was any less than that.

  

The inevitable consequence if this was allowed to continue is that Games Workshop would not be able to operate Hobby Centres, nor to support local trade accounts. And if this happened in more territories outside Europe, the loss of volume would leave Games Workshop no choice but to scale back our investment in new product development, further eroding our customer base. Not something that we or our customers would want us to do.

  

That is why we took the decision to take legitimate action to restrict European trade accounts from selling the goods they purchase from Games Workshop outside Europe. None of the other alternatives were viable.

  

While I understand that you may still be unhappy with our decision, it was taken to ensure we can continue to support the Games Workshop hobby communities around the world through our Games Workshop Hobby Centres and local trade accounts. And to ensure we continue to invest in developing the best possible new product releases every month. I hope therefore that over time you will see the benefits of this decision for you and your hobby.

 

 Yours sincerely,

  

Mark Wells

 Chief Executive

 18 May 2011

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Well that answer confirms what we had said here the other day: GW is trying to solve a problem by addressing the wrong cause. What should be understood by their chief executives is that people aren’t buying from indie stores in Europe because of the discounts said costumers offer. They do so because prices were they live are OUTRAGEOUS.

I would buy from a Local Gaming Store given two things:

1 – If it existed  here in Brazil and supported the gaming community like GW’s representative implies. I’ll say this once more for the sake of argument: There are no gaming stores carrying GW’s products in Brazil. The ones that did carry such products a while ago only sold them but did absolutely nothing akin to supporting the gaming community. I’ve visited quite a few of them and NEVER came across a single one which had a table you could play the game in or staff to explain the nuances of the hobby like they do in GW stores in the UK. Their sole interest was bleeding us dry of our money a lot like the colonialist model I’m mentioning a lot these days.

2 – Prices were at least similar to the ones of GW UK. People have been pointing that prices here are not fair. Let me add that prices here are OUTRAGEOUSLY UNFAIR. Think “Space Hulk” for instance. It was a limited release which goes on ebay today for about 200 dollars on average. That’s already expensive, and it translates in320 reais (Brazilian currency). I’ll add to the price the 60% import tax charged down here and find a grand total of R$ 512,00 (again five hundred and twelve reais). Well the same box goes for R$ 990,00 (yep… NINE HUNDRED AND NINETY REAIS!!!!) on a LGS which carries GW products. I should add that said exists solely on the internet.

I can hear people saying “AH! But that’s a limited release… prices are bound to be more reasonable in a brick and mortar store down there”. Well there’s another store which has some GW products for sale. It is a brick and mortar store which also sells on the internet. So let’s compare prices of… a dire avenger set. I need more of those for my elder. It costs £ 20,50 at GW’s website, which would translate into R$ 53,00 (fifty three reais), again adding taxes I get a grand total of R$ 84,00 (Eighty four reais). The same box on the afore mentioned LGS costs … R$ 210,00 (two hundred and ten reais!!!). Seriouslly! You can check it here (scroll down on the product list).

And before people say I’m contradicting myself because I’d said there were no LGS carrying GW products I should mention these are leftover stock from GW’s last attempt in establishing a foothold in Brazil through indie stores and a local distributor. Check the link and you’ll see lots of stock missing and there’s no inboud restocks. If you feel inclined to do some more calculations the  exchange rate today for the pound/real is £1,00 pound for R$ 2,60 reais.

Back to GW’s open letter, the more I read it the more it sounds like: “We’re doing it because we want more money … Indie stores are ruining are local businesses thus decreasing the amount of money we’re able to take from you. If you’re compelled to buy from a LGS at double prices we’ll make double the money… simple as that!!”.

It kinda makes sense from a company’s point of view right? GW only wants to protect its consumer base as clearly stated: “… the loss of volume would leave Games Workshop no choice but to scale back our investment in new product development, further eroding our customer base. Not something that we or our customers would want us to do”.


So why not make prices fair to the same consumer bases? The current prices were set back when the british pound was strong (I remember going to the UK with a 5:1 Real:Pound  exchange rate) and should be reviewed now that other currencies are stronger. I believe that in the long term the sales embargo will achieve the exact opposite and people WILL drop out of the hobby. I’m not saying I’ll do so but I’ll definitely buy a lot less. There’s a veritable host of other nice games out there and it’s high time Games Workshop noticed it only came to a position of prominence because of the very same consumers it’s trying to alienate now with embargoes and unreasonable price rises (resin was supposed to make models cheaper and prices went up!!!!).

Exchange rates will not “move back into alignment” as countries like Brazil and Australia are growing in the world scenario. Our money is getting stronger as a consequence of our economical growth and not because of some warp spawned abnormality. It’s Games Workshop who should try and adhere its way of doing business to something we call nowadays “Global Economy” instead of going so low as to have to enforce an effective embargo on sales to the afore mentioned countries. Seriously GET REAL!

I should also add that Wayland and Maelstrom did A LOT more in supporting the hobby in Brazil than Games Workshop, its local distributor or any local trade account as it was Wayland and Maelstrom which made the hobby largely available to people in the first place.

Instead of beating around the bush trying to justify an unreasonable and disrespectful policy, not only towards its costumers but to long time trade partners which are being openly accused of taking advantage of GW’s investments by “free riding” them, Mr. Mark Wells should state clearly that Games Workshop is a business hence it’s trying to maximize profit at the expense of alienating some consumers around the globe.

And don’t blame the amount of money invested on us hobbyists. We’re not kids! (Ok some of us are) GW does that amount of investment because it knows that money will be recouped in sales latter. GW invests money to produce top notch products not for the sake of its costumers but because said products sell, and sell for expensive prices, and well. Please do NOT take me for a fool.

In the end situation remains the same. I have been prohibited from exercising my basic consumer rights. Games Workshop is violating them. I have not been buying from Maelstrom Games or Wayland Games or even GW stores, when I have the opportunity to go abroad, because they offer discounts. If they sold me at full GW products I’d still buy from them because it would still be cheaper and because they’re much more convenient that any LGS in Brazil which would be at least 1.300 Km (one thousand and three hundred kilometers) from where I live (it’s a BIG country).

I have to add that the way Games Workshop has chosen to treat it’s Brazilian costumer is nothing short of regrettable. Time will tell the long term consequences of alienating costumers in a country where all the hobby had to keep going strong were the costumers themselves. Shame on you Games Workshop.

Over and out.

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Salve Leitor.

Acredito que muitos estejam acompanhando os posts sobre o embargo levado a efeito pela GW contra a comunidade brasileira devotada a seus jogos.

Ainda não leu nada sobre isso? Bom nós já tínhamos anunciado por aqui que a GW implantou uma nova política de vendas aplicável às lojas independentes baseadas na Europa efetivamente proibindo-as de vender para países fora da União Européia.

Essa noticia caiu como uma bomba sobre a comunidade brasileira uma vez que a absurda maioria de nós compra seus produtos das lojas independentes vitimadas pela proibição da GW.

“E qual seria o porquê dessa proibição?” Você pode se perguntar. Bem, como especulei com alguns amigos o cenário mais possível era que lojas locais, não só no Brasil mas também na Austrália, Nova Zelândia, Japão, Estados Unidos e no Canadá, pra nomear alguns países, tenham reclamado para a matriz da GW acerca da “injusta” competição com lojas como a Wayland Games e Maesltron Games (que segundo rumores responderiam juntas por um terço ou até mesmo metade das vendas de produtos GW na Europa).

Bom minha especulação foi confirmada hoje por uma carta aberta postada na internet onde Mark Wells, Principal executivo da GW, fala sobre os motivos que levaram ao embargo (traduzida livremente aqui):

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Caro Anthony,

 

Obrigado por contatar a Games Workshop acerca das mudanças em nossos termos comerciais para contas Européias. Eu sei que isso lhe frustrou e sinto muito por isso. Como um consumidor antigo você merece saber por que tomamos essa decisão.

 

Como você sabe, nós introduzimos as pessoas ao hobby da GW de colecionar, jogar e pintar miniaturas Citadel através de nossos Hobby Centres (Centros de Hobby) e revendedores locais. Os Centros de Hobby da GW conduzem jogos e sessões de pintura introdutórios, lições para iniciantes, atividades de hobby e eventos. Nós oferecemos tudo isso de graça e só conseguimos recuperar esse investimento se os consumidores comprarem produtos de nós.

 

Nos locais onde não temos um Centro de Hobby GW, nós oferecemos suporte aos revendedores independentes locais. Essas lojas fornecem um local conveniente para que os consumidores comprem nossos produtos próximo do local onde vivem. Nós oferecemos a essas lojas times de serviço ao consumidor local e depósitos para nos assegurarmos que os consumidores tenham pronto acesso aos nossos produtos mais vendidos e novos lançamentos. Muitos consumidores descobrem o hobby dessa maneira.

 

Além disso, nós investimos milhões de libras a cada ano em nosso estúdio de design e fábrica para nos assegurarmos de lançar mensalmente novos produtos. Isso torna o hobby Games Workshop mais excitante para os consumidores existentes ajudando-os a permanecer mais tempo no hobby. Nós só conseguimos cobrir os custos de fazer isso por causa do volume de consumidores que recrutamos e desenvolvemos através de nossos Centros de Hobby locais e revendedores.

 

É por essa razão que alteramos nossos termos de comércio Europeus. Ao longo dos últimos anos diversas moedas distanciaram-se de seus valores relativos históricos e assim abriu-se uma porta para que alguns revendedores explorassem essas variações cambiais e oferecessem grandes descontos para hobbistas em outros países. Foi esse o caso com revendedores europeus na internet vendendo para alguns de nossos clientes em outros países.

 

Enquanto isso pode parecer ótimo a curto prazo, o simples fato é que os revendedores Europeus na internet não investem nenhum dinheiro no crescimento do hobby em seu país. O modelo de negócio deles consiste em minimizar seus custos e aproveitar-se dos investimentos da GW em lojas locais e em criar uma base de consumidores.

 

Nós por outro lado continuamos a ter de pagar nossos empregados australianos, aluguéis e encargos em dólares australianos. Enquanto alguns clientes sugeriram que diminuíssemos nossos preços pela metade, a única forma com que poderíamos fazer isso seria diminuirmos pela metade os salários de nossos empregados australianos, o mesmo com nossos aluguéis e não pagássemos fornecedores até que o cambio se normalize. Essa é a realidade de reduzir preços nessa escala. E nós dois sabemos que consumidores motivados somente pelos preços não mudariam seu comportamento se as mudanças fossem menores que isso.

 

A consequencia inevitável é que se permitíssemos que isso continuasse GW não seria mais capaz de operar Centros de Hobby ou dar suporte aos revendedores locais. E se isso acontecesse em mais territórios fora da Europa a perda de volume não nos deixaria outra escolha senão diminuir nosso investinemto no desenvolvimento de novos produtos, erodinfo ainda mais nossa base de consumidores. Isso não é algo que nós ou nossos consumidores gostariam que fizéssemos.

 

É por isso que tomamos a decisão de tomar ações legítimas no sentido de restringir os revendedores Europeus de vender os produtos comprados da GW fora da Europa. Nenhuma outra alternativa era viável.

 

Enquanto eu entendo que você possa não estar satisfeito com nossa decisão, ela foi tomada para garantir que nós possamos continuar a oferecer suporte às comunidades do hobby GW em todo o mundo através de nossos Centros de Hobby GW e revendedores locais. E para garantir que continuemos a investir no desenvolvimento dos melhores produtos a serem lançados mensalmente. Espero que com o tempo você verá que os benefícios desta decisão serão para você e seu hobby.

 

Sinceramente,

Mark Wells.

Executivo chefe.

18 de maio de 2011

 

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Eu não sei vocês, mas para mim essa carta é uma tentativa pífia de justificar o óbvio. A Games Workshop é uma empresa e como tal está tentando maximizar seus ganhos obrigando os jogadores a comprarem de suas lojas e revendedores locais. Se um revendedor para de comprar da GW alegando decréscimo nas vendas é claro que ela vai tentar tomar medidas para evitar essa evasão de clientes.

Só que a meu ver essa medida é burra. É burra porquê a maioria de nós não se sentou lamentando e aceitando essa decisão, mas sim ficou chateada com tamanho desrespeito à pessoa mais importante nessa equação que é o consumidor.

Essa carta é uma tentativa rasteira de colocar a culpa nos próprios consumidores alegando, em suma, que a Games Workshop investe milhões em prol de seus consumidores e assim nós deveríamos simplesmente pagar os absurdos preços implementados aqui sem reclamar. Ora nenhum de nós é um imbecil acéfalo. Graças ao bom Deus o hobbista que se dedica aos jogos GW por aqui tem um pouco de erudição e entende que toda essa balela é fruto única e tão somente da vontade de aumentar os lucros da empresa ainda que a revelia de clientes como os brasileiros que com o embargo ficam impedidos de adquirir produtos da companhia.

Enfim… É lamentável a situação em que a Games Workshop nos coloca e a forma como trata o consumidor brasileiro nesse momento. Somente o tempo vai mostrar as conseqüências do embargo para o hobby principalmente neste país onde os maiores defensores e progadadores do hobby são os próprios hobbistas.

Até a próxima.

Hello there.

It’s been a day and now pretty much everyone already knows about the latest blow dealt by Games Workshop against its own costumer base outside Europe.

If you haven’t heard it yet I’ll summarize it for you: GW has enacted new terms and conditions to independent retailers located in Europe thus preventing said stores from selling to costumers outside the European Union.

Therefore, like the true empires of yore, Games Workshop is dictating who can buy its products and which prices each costumer should pay. I might be getting something wrong here but isn’t that plainly illegal? Shouldn’t prices be determined by the market itself? Shouldn’t the costumer buy from those who offer better prices and service? In the end, shouldn’t the choices pertaining my hobby be entrusted to the sole interested person, and by that I mean me!

I have to admit being in a mild state of shock since yesterday. I can’t seem to wrap my mind around the fact that I have been alienated from the hobby which has occupied a great deal of my time and thoughts over the course of the last 13 years.

I should point out I live in Brazil. The gaming community here is pretty spread apart and even if there were stores carrying GW products at reasonable prices here, which there aren’t,  ’d still have to travel an average 1.500 Kilometers to get to them, so it should come as no surprise that buying online has been my main source of models over the years.

Before going any further I should profess that, even though I don’t condone GW’s way of doing business I am a hardcore fan of the games the company produces and of the fictional universes such games are in. I understand GW holds the IP rights over all its creations but one thing should be clear to them, these games and fictional universes are as much ours as they are theirs. We, as gamers, and readers and fans, have invested as much commitment to the game as GW itself, but, without being paid a single penny for it.

Plain and simple I believe this new policy being enforced by GW is wrong in the sense that it alienates its costumers and goes against our consumer rights as it prevents me, as a costumer, to buy choosing the best price offered. Not only that but it also goes against the established market economy and perverts basic economy tenets like free trade, supply and demand and competitive markets. I wouldn’t be surprised if people found out these new terms enacted by GW are in breach of international antitrust and competition laws.

There’s been some criticism about my choice of words for when we first broke out the rumours about the incoming “surprise” GW had for us. Some claimed “Embargo” was too strong a word to describe the situation. I have to answer such criticism by pointing out “Embargo” is indeed the word best suited to describe what’s going on right now.

According to Wikipedia, and other dictionaries, an “Embargo” constitutes a “… partial or complete prohibition of commerce and trade with a particular country, in order to isolate it”. Well, pardon my french, but that’s exactly what Games Workshop is doing when it enforces a policy prohibiting independent stores from selling to costumers located in countries outside the E.U..

It is my firm belief that Games Workshop could learn a lot by studying the errors of its countrymen from the past, namely those involved in the episodes which went down in history books as “The Stamp Act of 1765” and “The Boston Tea Party”. As for me and the hobby I’ve dedicated myself to in over 13 years. Well I have to admit being hurt and still having not clearly decided which way to go. More on that soon.

Over and out.

Hello there.

I’m sad to inform that the rumours have been true. From now on Independent Stockists in Europe will no longer be able to sell Games Workshop’s products to countries outside the European Community. This is even bigger than first announced as it means Canada, and the United States of America will also be effectively embargoed from buying from European independent Stockists.

Maelstrom Games has issued a public statement on the matter from where I extracted the following:

Games Workshop’s new Terms and Conditions
Firstly, Games Workshop’s new Terms and Conditions, which come into force on the 31st of May 2011. These, among other things, restrict the sale of language products – i.e., rulebooks and codices that are not in English – and, most crucially of all, restrict the sale of all of their products to the European Union, although there are a couple of countries (such as Norway and Switzerland) that are geographically within Europe but not in the EU that we can still sell to.

The full list of countries that we can sell GW products to is as follows:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom

Obviously this means that all of our faithful Games Workshop customers from the Anglosphere – Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States – as well as those from Brazil, Chile, Peru, Russia, Japan and South Korea (apologies for those countries I have missed out) will now miss out on our superb service and cheap prices, but I’m afraid the terms and conditions of our contract with Games Workshop mean that we have to say goodbye.


It’s indeed a sad day for us all in the affected countries as this new policy could very well affect the future of the hobby for us all.

More over the course of the day.

Over and out.